Tag Archive: Suffering


Last week I introduced the concept of being a healing Christian, ministry and church. Since my buddy Dwayne informed me he wanted to “heal” in 2019, “healing” has been coming up over and over again.

Remember, I’m not talking about physical healing.  It is more of a healing that comes from the inside out.  With that in mind, Jesus didn’t separate the body, mind and soul.  He actually kept the three together since they are so vitally linked together.  Let’s face it.  If the body hurts, our mind and soul will hurt.   If our mind is constantly depressed or preoccupied, our body and soul will suffer.  If our soul is sour what makes us think the other two won’t be?  Jesus kept the three together since we are such a delicate creation.  

We do not believe in Jesus to get an easy life.  If that were sound theology, then the poor apostles were given a bum deal.  They all died a horrible death except for John.  Even with John, it is believed he was placed in boiling water and later exiled to the island of Patmos.  At that time there were no resorts on the island.  It was a hard life.  

Paul, the apostle, in Second Corinthians says we suffer so we can minister to fellow sufferers.  Our world says we should not have to suffer.  They are wrong.  This world is suffering.  I have yet to meet anyone who has not had to suffer real pain in this life.  There is the pain of broken bones and surgery.  The pain that sears the soul is broken relationships, betrayal, abandonment and lies.  Best friends can be the worst friends.  Family pain is brutal.  Our bones will heal.  Our bodies will mend.  But our minds and souls hurt for a lifetime.

Recently, I came across a lady who though no fault of her own experienced the death of a child.  While functional, she could not get the feelings of guilt and failure out of her heart.  She will probably die a broken person.  Now here is where we have to take a hard look.  What is faith in Christ at this point?

Some will say the broken lady does not have enough faith.  Some might say she has a false impression of who Jesus really is.  Others might say she never had faith.  I talked to her.  Without question she believed and believes in the sacrifice of Jesus Christ. So, what is the problem?  Does she not pray enough?  No, she prays daily.  Does she not read the Bible?  Nope, she does.  Did she quit on the church?  Every Sunday she is there.  So, what’s the problem?  She is a human being, just like you and me.

Sunday is not a day to put on a front like we have it all together.  Quite the opposite.  It should be a place where broken people can come and find their hope and healing in Jesus.  It is a healing that takes a lifetime.  

This gets us down to what it means to be a soul healer.  First and foremost we must embrace the human condition.  It has been a long time since I have come across anyone that doesn’t have a sense that we are broken.  I once had an on going conversation with a psychology teacher.  In the middle, he asked if I was a Christian.  Of course I responded in the affirmative.  I asked him how he figured it out.  He replied, “You know something is broken, and we have not come up with the solution.”  I asked him if he could give an answer to the human sin issue.  He replied, “No, and all our science fails to answer it as well.”  Of course it does.  What’s broke is broke.  

I don’t have to point out brokenness when someone comes for counsel as a believer or a non-believer.  Moral goodness is relative.  When brought under the microscope of God’s holiness, we are in big trouble.  We know it.  Our own arrogance doesn’t want to acknowledge it especially in this critical culture.  

While it seems like a hopeless condition there is healing.  It isn’t healing that takes away the pain or the memory.  Not at all.  Actually pain is a great reminder of the need.  That’s the problem with great prosperity.  We can insulate ourselves from brokenness to some extent.  It causes us to avoid the truth.  Once realized, the healing is the ability to get up the next day and find a new normal.  

Jesus never promised the same old, same old.  No, the gospel says there is a new beginning.  We take with us the scars and yet-to-be-fixed brokenness and find a new normal based on the hope and the truth that God allowed us to suffer to bring healing to someone else.  In the meantime, we can get out of bed the next morning since we are in the hands of the Lord Jesus who gave us the example of suffering to bring healing.

How do we get out of bed?  Dependent upon grace that God has already granted us and the grace we turn around and give to fellow sufferers.  A healing church allows God to do what God does instead of rescuing the hurting and becoming their little “s” savior.  To do that involves truly walking in the Spirit.  Love the unlovable.  Have joy in the rain and the sun.  Be peace among the chaos.   Exercise patience. Practice meekness to conquer the self-serving pride.  Be kind.  A gentle touch heals a bitter wound.  Encourage self-control for the hurting,  as they tend to hurt others in their suffering.    

To heal we rest on God’s path and timing.  In the meantime, let’s walk together.  My name’s John.  What’s yours?  I have a story and I would love to hear yours. 

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I limped into church today.  I shed a few tears as well.  As I stood up to lead in prayer, all I could see were people I’ve walked with the past 12 years and I know their limp.  Sometimes our limp becomes us.  Like Jacob in the Old Testament.  God touched his hip, and he limped the rest of his life.  God does that.  He causes us to limp so we can slow down and know him.  We tend to want to take the lead instead of follow.  

I was reading an article the other day that talked about hurting Christians.  The author must limp as well.  He points to four elements that often leave us far from the spiritual high that others seem to relish.  The four characteristics that suck the life out of us are: isolation, loneliness, shame and worthlessness.  Often all four are a result of sin that finds us.  Other times we have no problem finding it on our own. 

It’s hard to think that in our current world we might struggle with isolation or loneliness.  To me they’re kissing cousins of the evil world.  We don’t need demon possession in our world.  Isolation and loneliness are evil’s best friends   

Church can often promote isolation and loneliness.  One time when you limp into church and someone asks, “How are you today?,” tell them.  For some reason we have this idea that Christians are not supposed to have issues much less sin issues.  When the body of Christ gathers, it should be a safe haven for those who limp.  Unfortunately, the local bar is the only safe haven.  In church you can call yourself a sinner; just don’t say what kind.  

When someone unloads his or her burdens, the kissing cousin of loneliness tag teams with isolation.  I’ve often pointed out that Jesus indeed answers our needs.  What we have failed to learn is that the Holy Spirit resides in believers.  It is through believers that he moves and his Holy Spirit flows.  We are the conduit for the power of God.  If we don’t answer the need of the limping, hurting brother or sister somebody or something else will.  

I honestly believe the main reason churches are struggling to keep people in the pews is their inability to care well for the limping, weary traveler on the path of life.  We have decided to choose, as a friend of mine who struggles to get out of bed every Sunday morning calls it, “a faith defined by unicorns and rainbows.”  As a friend asked this week, “Doesn’t Jesus want me to be happy?”  “Yes,” I answered, “but only by walking in the ways of the Lord as defined by the Holy Scriptures.”  Let’s just say he left quickly.  

Limping into church often lets others know we are suffering.  Since we learned nobody wants to be around suffering anymore (Apostle Paul said it’s the way into the kingdom of God) each limp sends impulses of shame to the heart.  Surely, if no one else is limping, something is wrong with us.  I asked that this morning, “What’s wrong with me?”  Maybe I’m not walking with the Lord.  Maybe I’m depressed.  Maybe I’m not praying enough.  Maybe I’m too serious.  Maybe I’m this.  Maybe I’m that.  Maybe.  Maybe.  Since no one wants to connect with the limp or tears, you know what that shame will do next week?  Keep us in bed.  

Eventually, as we wallow in our pain, worthlessness will take us to places we thought we would never go.  All four isolation, loneliness, shame and worthlessness – pounce on the wounded, leaving them paralyzed and numb.

A friend recently told me his mother died and he was absent from church for six weeks and not a soul called on him or showed up at the funeral.  He was on the path.  

Another soul talked about suffering the rejection by her friends due to a wayward husband.   There seems to be an unspoken fear of the single woman.  Instead of embracing the crippled woman, she is forced to limp in and out.

Jesus told his disciples a story.  He said there was a king who was having a banquet.  He invited the expected guests; the ones who usually attend a king’s banquet.  Only they had plenty of excuses.  So the king told his disciples to go out into the highway and byways and invite “the poor, the crippled, the lame and the blind” to his banquet.  I found out today in Luke 14 that there is nothing wrong with my limp.  There is nothing wrong with your limp either.  Line up the wheelchairs and the crutches next Sunday.  The crippled are coming to the banquet! Worship well!  We got the invite.

“Where is God?”  “Why me?” These two questions permeate our lives when things go wrong.  Not just when they go wrong.  It’s when they go miserable.  This past week I lost a friend.  He was fine.  Suddenly he is sick.  Hospitalized.  Things go way wrong, and, the next thing one knows he is gone.  He was too young.  We look up to the heavens and ask the two questions looking for a reasonable answer.  We probably won’t get it.  At least we won’t get one that satisfies.

I could give a sound Biblical answer.  Most Christians know the theology behind death.  But there remains this little piece of us that would like to know what went wrong.  We are not satisfied with what went right.  Each and every one of us, even though we know it’s not true, thinks God should grant us long life and blessings.  I hear it all the time, “Have a blessed day.”  I wish we could put that one to rest.  We are already blessed according to Ephesians 1.  We’ve been granted all of them already!  What more do we want?  We want to be in control of the blessings.  It doesn’t work that way.

We can’t seem to get our hands around the idea that Jesus left the comfort of heaven to rescue man.  The minute he left the Father, he was suffering.  The suffering reaches a crescendo when the Father veils himself in the last three hours while his Son hung on the cross, bearing our sin.  Jesus cried out, “My God, My God why have you forsaken me!”  It is the way of true redemption.

Yes, the hurt and pain does feel like we have been abandoned and forsaken.  Yet, as Scripture so adequately says, “Joy comes in the morning.”  Joy comes when we see beyond our vision.  My friend will not have to suffer any longer in this world.  As the Word also says, “Absent from the body; present with the Lord.”  We are not cheated in his death, and neither is he.  We along with my friend are given a few years.  What’s 10 or 20 more in relation to eternity?  Our death is not the end.  It’s only the beginning.   

The joy that comes in the morning is not so much thinking we will see each other again.  The joy is to know my friend is safe and secure in the presence of the Lord Jesus.  Can anyone imagine what it will be like to be so safe and secure in the presence of all good?  There is no evil in the presence of Jesus.  None!  There is no depravity allowed in.  The reason we (depraved for sure) can be in His presence is the sacrifice of Jesus upon the cross.  His grace is sufficient.  Why?  It’s all we need.  

We who are left behind will wonder why he didn’t get to see his grandchildren grow up.  He won’t be there when his kids need that fatherly advice.  His wife will miss his presence in the night.  To this day, I miss my father-in-law.  I mainly miss his smile.  He was always smiling.  I think the world could have been coming to a literal end, and he would still be there smiling.  I hate Parkinson’s Disease.  It stole his smile before it stole him.  Yes, we are still bound by this earth, but he is free.  

Jesus, very early in his ministry said, “Blessed are they who mourn…”  I used to wonder about that one.  I finally realized mourning shows great love.  We do not mourn those we do not love.  We do not mourn those who bear our anger and bitterness.  Mourning shows a great life, a great family, and a great God.  He promised the mourners comfort, that only God can grant.  It’s a comfort that knows the truth and looks into the future. 

“Where is God?”  He is right there in front of all of us.  That is where the Shepherd takes his place, guiding His sheep along the weary paths of life.  He didn’t leave us.  He can’t.  In fact, Jesus said when we go our own way, He will come and find us.  We don’t find Him.  He comes and gets us.  Amazing…I don’t think any other religious practice has a God coming to rescue his wandering sheep.  He’s where he promised to be.  

“Why me?”  I’m sorry but we all must go through the fire.  We aren’t there yet.  My friend is, but we are not.  So instead of wondering what God is doing, we turn to a little book in the back of the New Testament titled Titus.  The Apostle Paul wrote to him and answered his questions.  He wrote, “Looking for the blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of our great God and Savior, Jesus Christ.”  When that occurs, many will be without a job.  No more health care.  No more doctors needed.  No health insurance to be purchased.  No more pain.  No more death.  

Not here but there.

Thank you Jesus you told us we could mourn our loved ones.  Thank you, Jesus, that we will be comforted with the One who suffered the cruelest of all.  Thank you, Jesus, that because of you, we don’t have to suffer for eternity.  Do you know my Jesus?  

Today’s article is dedicated in memory of my friend, David Marcy. 

This week, yes the week before Easter, has been a rough one. Overall I’m fine and I don’t mean “Frustrated, Insecure, Neurotic and Emotional.” While some would say I’m probably one or more of these, none are over the top. It probably has something to do with the Holy Week and Easter being right around the corner.
Easter is supposed to be the celebration that brings hope to our hopelessness. It is to be the pinnacle to a season of reflection about our weaknesses and failures. Jesus conquering death, slapping the evil forces in the face with his resurrection, is to inspire and move believers to life. But for some reason I have been reminded that good news of the resurrection is not always perceived in such a way.
Here we are going to talk about life beyond the grave. Explain that to a 6 year old who stayed up all night with his sick guinea pig only to have it die the next morning. He doesn’t necessarily understand the abstract spiritual life. He has to process that his guinea pig that he loved and only had for one month is dead.
Then the phone rings and you find out a friend from your past at the age of 35 had pneumonia, passed a blood clot and died. Spiritual talk, Bible verses and trite sayings don’t necessarily sooth the mourning soul. Proverbs says “Don’t sing song to a heavy heart.” The author of that one got it right. Sometimes we just sit and ask God, “Why?” We probably won’t get an answer we don’t already know.
The pains and sorrow so life won’t go away this week. We remember the Holy Week for the sufferings Jesus went through to pour out his grace upon mankind. I agree 100%. It is soothing to the soul to know the God I put my rest upon understands the thoughts and feelings that plague us.
A reader sent me an email a few weeks ago. He was talking about the hurt in his life. As I sit this morning trying to be encouraged in the resurrection of our Lord the song he sent to me in his email hits home. It’s the song, Grace by Rachel Platten. I’m not ready to have someone screaming at me “He is Risen” Sunday morning expecting the response “He is risen indeed.” Instead we need the soft voice of a Savior who says “my grace is sufficient.”
There is not enough space to publish the words of the entire song. It can be found on Youtube. Consider a few words:
Is this what I’ve become? Someone who gets jealous of someone?
Instead of open arms and honest praise, I’m closing doors and pushing love away
When did I come undone? When did the colors of my canvas start to run?
I can’t control the teardrops on my face, I know this ain’t the girl my mother raised
I used to wear love like an army I used to know nothing could harm me
Now fear got up all in my head, I’m all in my head, And I made a mess, I confess, I’m ashamed
Chorus: And I need grace To step inside my mind, help me be a better person
Or at least a better version of me, ’Cause right now, all I wanna do is scream
That I need grace,’Cause I’m running low on faith
And I really wanna change my heart,’Cause I’m falling apart these days
And what I really need is grace,Watching over my mistakes
Yeah I really wanna change my heart,’Cause I’m falling apart these days
And what I really need is grace.
Thank you Paul for sharing your cry for God’s gift of grace.
This Sunday, Easter Sunday, I don’t necessarily remember the resurrection so I can sit around and wait to die and go to heaven. I remember the resurrection this year as a sign of the hope I have in Jesus and the pouring out of his grace when my faith is weak and as Rachel sang, “I made a mess and I’m ashamed.”
Now, I can softly say, “He is risen.”