Tag Archive: Baby Boomers


Even though it is the middle of summer and we have many more days to go till fall, there is change in the air.  The change has nothing to do with nature’s seasons.  The change is for the modern day church ,and it has nothing to do with the type of music sung or which version of the Bible is used on Sunday.  Its cultural change, and it’s coming fast.

Unless you have paid no attention to the news and live in a cave, we should be aware that our culture is not changing but rather has changed.  News flash!  There is more change in the air, and we are not going to like it.  

It is a fact that the voting base will shift to the younger generations in the next election. The baby boomer generation, which is the most conservative and “Christian” of the existing generations, will lose its political clout.  Let me rephrase that.  It has lost it.  There are more people of age that we would classify as “millennial” who can vote than baby-boomers.  As the Eagles sang in 2007, “It’s Your World Now.”  Honestly, we of the baby-boomer generation don’t like it and are scared about it.  

I’m not so sure we are scared for gospel reasons.  I personally think we are scared for life-style reasons.  That’s a discussion for another day.  It will probably have gospel implications.  I’m not being a prophet, but these are some changes in the next era we will probably see, barring a revival unparalleled in our history.  Again, I don’t think they are all that bad.  It all depends on how one looks at them.

One of the first changes coming will be the loss of tax exempt status and possible taxation on certain things we never dreamed would be taxed in the church.  It doesn’t even have to be due to religious reasons.  Our government is running out of money.  If there is a pot of gold out there somewhere, they will get it one day.  It has already happened to a certain extent.  By raising the exemption level so high, fewer “givers” are able to claim their gifts and tithes as a tax exemption.  It’s only the beginning.  

As I said before, that’s ok.  We will be called to give our gifts and tithes by God’s calling not the tax deduction.  If the government taxes our properties for the right of holding religious services, then we will find out where our hearts lie.  That happens often throughout the Bible.  Look up the story of Ananias and Sapphira in Acts 5.  Their heart was not with God but rather how they looked before man.  Everything really is a heart issue even if we don’t realize it.  Giving our offering is a heart issues as well even when we don’t get a tax deduction.    

I do believe a day is coming when bi-vocational pastors will be the norm instead of the oddity.  Most churches in America are small in size.  There are more pastors serving in churches under 200 than in those over 200 in attendance.  With the financial situation and the already aging of American congregations, along with the decrease in attendance by the younger generations, there will be fewer and fewer churches able to support the pastor much less have a paid staff.  If these churches want to continue, they will have to sort out the issues that will arise with a bi-vocational pastor in place.

Again, that’s ok.  I see two possible benefits.  Pastors might make better decisions since their main pay check is no longer dependent on keeping the members happy.  Along with that, members may realize they cannot replace the pastor they have so easily and therefore extend grace more than ever before.  

Along with bi-vocational pastors comes churches with less or no paid professional staff.  The burden of ministry will fall to the attenders.  Did I just hear local pastors say “Amen.”  All of this will probably put many things back in their right place.  Instead of putting on a show, we might just relate to one another.  Instead of depending on the youth pastor to show our kids the way, they will have to get it from us (of course they still do, we just don’t realize it).  Instead of being a busy church, we might become missional churches.  Paying less staff leaves more money for “the thirsty, the hungry, the naked, the sick, the stranger, the imprisoned.”  (Matthew 25).  See, it’s not all that bad.

The biggest change ahead is already happening.  It is not going to be popular to be a Christian ,much less a verbal Christian.  The shift has happened.  It happened when Generations X and Y (by the way, they are close to retirement now) walked out of the church instead of staying with their spiritual family.  Their children are growing up with very little God influence.  Therefore, it’s simple math.  It’s a spiritual war.  The apostle Paul said we are “wresting with principalities of the air,” meaning there is a constant war against the name of Jesus.  It’s coming fast.

That’s ok.  We don’t have to pay large sums of money to go on mission trips.  Our mission field lives right next door.  It is a great time to be a Christian when the lines get drawn.  It might hurt.  The Apostle Paul wrote in Philippians about two graces given to us by Jesus.  One is the grace of salvation.  The second is the grace of suffering.  We all are aware that if something has great value we will suffer for it.  As far as I can tell, there is nothing more valuable than the name of Jesus.  

That is OK! 

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I’m turning 60 years old this year.  I’m not sure how I got this old.  Just yesterday I was 45.  It seems like yesterday we moved to South Carolina.  Fourteen years later and it seems like yesterday the moving van pulled up.  It took some time.  Baltimore is no longer home.  Bluffton is home.  It helps when the grandkids live right around the corner. Such transitions take time.  I don’t know where the last 14 years have gone.  

Since I can now live in Sun City (I don’t), and I’m entering my sixties, I decided to write to the older generations.  Just today I got a chance to talk to a 21 year old.  He was so young.  My kids are in their late 30’s.  Having a chance to engage a kid was energizing for sure.  In many aspects his life is drastically different than my world.  He doesn’t know life without a cell phone.  I remember days we worried about the influence of television.  He doesn’t even watch it.  He watches his cell phone.  

Recently, I was in a meeting with two different generations.  One of the older men sat and listened for the entire hour.  He didn’t say a word.  As we left, one of the young guys referred to his silence.  He replied, “I’m listening and learning.”  What was he learning?  He was learning about the conflicts and challenges the young guys face.  He was learning there was a lot he did not know.  So he listened.

More and more, especially in the church, the older generation (Baby Boomers) are becoming detached from the technologically infused younger generations.  The detachment means the kids don’t call.  It means if the Boomers don’t engage the Internet, more than likely they won’t be in communication with their grandkids.  Last week I Face-Timed my mother who lives in West Virginia.  She found it amazing to see her youngest son some 650 miles away.  For the first time in a long time, she didn’t ask when we were going to stop by.  The technology might be scary for us old guys, but it’s quite amazing.  

We like to blame the younger generations for the detachment.  It’s not their fault.  It’s nobody’s fault.  Let’s be truthful.  It’s hard enough to maintain the relationships right in from of us much less keeping the long distance ones going.  Some of the detachment is distance.  We blame them for not staying in contact.  They blame us for moving away.  Meanwhile, we refuse to learn the new technology that can connect us with them on the other side of the world.  

On top of distance, there are the cultural influences that separate us.  I still hear the Boomers complaining about no prayer in school.  I hate to say it, but that bus left the station a long time ago, and it’s not coming back.  Today, my grandkids have to figure out transgenders, as well as the broken family unit.  Often they have to do so on their own.  

Meanwhile, our generation complains that the younger generation is selfish and egocentric.  We must be honest.  We are just as bad, if not worse.  When the Bible talks about thinking about others more than ourselves and we don’t apply it to our children and grandchildren, we are the selfish and narcissistic ones.  When we demand they respond to us when we played our part in the failed relationship, we violate the basics of Jesus’ words about loving our neighbor, which means laying down our life for their sake of our neighbor.  We fail to understand that our kids are Biblically defined as our neighbor.  We don’t know them.  It’s long over due to stop blaming anybody and start listening. Listening to learn and to know.

We are studying the Psalms on Sunday during the education hour.  I have been reminded that Psalms say a lot about generational relationships.  It doesn’t surprise me that our generation only knows Bible passages that point fingers at our kids.  Psalms 71 says we have a responsibility to proclaim the power of God and his marvelous deeds to the next generation.  Somehow, we replaced God.  We declare our deeds – we think we are the greatest generation.  No wonder they quit listening.  

 In Psalm 78 Asaph asks God to have their children set their hope in God and not be like their fathers who are a stubborn and rebellious generation whose heart was not faithful to God.  Faithfulness is not defined by church attendance.  It’s defined by loving God and loving others.  Anybody notice that Jesus loved others by listening first and responding second?

Psalm 145 repeats Psalm 71.  Instead of talking about us and pointing fingers at them we are to declare the work of our Lord. What is the work of the Lord?  He loved us.  With that love he moves us to love others not just ourselves.  

Maybe we exasperated our children (Ephesians 5).  There is only one act of love to redeem our relationships with our kids.  Ask for forgiveness.  By laying our lives down we will then be considered the greatest generation.  

The recent events politically and culturally have left a very divided society.  Adding social media to the mix, where anyone can offer a critique at any given time leaves us with a critical spirit and a divided nation.  This cultural phenomenon has occupied my thoughts for some time now.  Maybe I can share a few since it potentially has a tremendous impact on all of us.

Back in 1973 Paul Kurtz and Edwin H. Wilson wrote what we know as the Humanist Manifesto II.  The Church did not pay much attention to it.  The movement actually began in 1933 with the writing of the 1st Manifesto.  We paid no attention to it since Christianity dominated the scene.  However, it was a religious humanism that began to infect the education system and even the church.  

It is important to take notice of this movement.  In 2003 the humanist expression went from individuals to groups with Humanist Manifesto III.  It’s not a movement.  It’s a faith expression.  It is a faith in man and science.  Man is assumed to be basically good.  As Wikipedia says, “humans are the integral part of nature and working to benefit society maximizes human nature.”  These two elements fuel dissension with the Christian faith.  Unfortunately, the Christian faith has been influenced with a man -ocused expression dominated by a prosperity teaching that is far from the Biblical Jesus.  

Am I boring you yet?  I have stated often that Christians like to talk “what” and don’t pay enough attention to “why.”  The humanist movement has dominated higher education.  Man is good, and getting in with the crowd for the betterment of society is the end result.  If you are not with the in- crowd you are ostracized.  Who between the ages of 16 and 25 wants to be ostracized?  And we wonder why our children and grandchildren raised in the faith walk away in their late teens and early twenties.  It is that age when the philosophies of the world that we paid little attention to become practical life.  

On the other hand, Christianity says man is basically evil, and the hope for a better society is by faith in Jesus Christ.  That doesn’t gel well with the humanist movement at all.  For a young believer in the college scene it doesn’t take long to grasp that the two don’t mix.  Few are prepared and fewer survive.  

The religious humanist movement has been patient and quiet.  They don’t need big people.  All they have done is influenced young minds since 1933.  That is 75 years.  To understand the mess consider the impact.  The last generation dominated by Christian morals and beliefs was the Baby Boomers.  With the generations past them (Gen X,Y, and Z) came the tsunami of humanist educational faith.  That is correct…faith.  Everyone believes in something, and our culture now believes in man as our hope.  Religious humanism is now a practice not a philosophy.  With the last general election Baby Boomers (the last faith-based generation) have lost the voting block.  They are now outnumbered.  The religious humanists are now not only in control of the education system; they now have the popular vote.  God is out in education.  He is out in our politics and barely alive in our families.  

No wonder we are at odds in our country.  The belief in separation of church and state from the humanist view (no God anywhere and anytime) has now impacted all aspects of culture.  Remember, they believe the only hope is man to be working together for the benefit of society.  The question is “Who determines what is a benefit?”  The voting populous does.  

I have just scratched the philosophical and historical basis of an anti-Jesus society.  We didn’t think it could happen in good ole America did we?  It isn’t a coming tsunami.  It’s here.  

So what do Bible believing, Jesus based people of the faith do?

Some are in a separatist mode.  They are isolating and ruing the day all hell breaks lose.  

Others have compromised.  They have allowed religious humanist beliefs to impact their expression of the Christian faith.  In one aspect they have tried to meet the enemy half way.  It doesn’t work.  The Scriptures say we are battling an adversary who is a “roaring lion seeking who it will devour.”  The enemy takes no prisoners.  Compromise will lead to being devoured with anti-Biblical thought and practice.  Again it’s not coming; it’s here.

Jesus entered the same type of world.  Nothing has changed in the history of man.  We either depend upon man or God.  Take your pick!  The methodology is not what we tend to think as well.  Jesus said to love your neighbor.  He didn’t give us an out.  He included our enemy as well (Matthew 5:44).  Christianity is not a spectator sport, and you won’t hear the bugle sound retreat.  As Jesus encouraged, “Do not be afraid of those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul. Rather, be afraid of the One who can destroy both soul and body in hell.” All is not lost.  Love well. 

Today I write a letter to Generation X and Y…Z is too young yet.  This is to my children’s generation and my children as well… 

Dear Millennials,

You are my children and the parents of my grandchildren.  I have watched you grow up.  I will admit I complain about you.  However, at times I have stood in awe of you.  Every time I think I have you figured out, you surprise me.  My generation (baby boomers) likes to think we are the greatest generation and you are the not so great generation.  Forgive us.  We have our issues for sure.

The world has changed in your short life.  We thought it was awesome when man stepped on the moon.  What has transpired since your birth makes the Apollo program pale in significance.  There are more and more discoveries, inventions and philosophical changes I can only imagine how hard it is for you to keep up.  Just when you figure out life, it changes. And, often, that can be in hours.  As for us, we are pretty set in our ways.  

Watching you try to figure out employment and financial security makes me hurt.  We got college degrees and made a living with ease.  If we didn’t get a college degree, we learned a trade and often made more money working the trade than those who went to college.  As for you, the age of specialization has failed you.  We did not encourage you to learn a skill.  We told you to get degrees that are meaningless.  Careers have totally disappeared from our society, and we wonder why you came back and lived in the basement.

We hate to admit it but, many times, big business sent your jobs overseas to make our retirement accounts profitable.  However, we don’t want to talk about that.  In your lifetime greed morphed into avarice, leaving your entire world governed by consumerism and the mighty dollar.  In that, you better have lots of them.  If you don’t become workaholics like us we think you are lazy and selfish.  Boy, are we wrong.

I’m worried about you.  Opioid addiction is not retreating.  Your suicide rates are increasing yearly.  Divorce is now commonplace.  We didn’t have to worry about sexual identities, and we didn’t have to worry about offending someone of a different sexual orientation.  It must be confusing.  Our sexual revolution in the 60’s has blossomed into total sexual confusion. We started this mess and now don’t want to talk about it.  Even in the church, a young man told me recently it is hard to find a virgin.  The silence of my peers speaks.   

Instead of demanding your repentance, we need to repent.  We need to repent of our selfishness.  We left it up to the professionals to do the “Jesus” stuff.  We lived one way on Sunday and told you to be quiet about what went on the rest of the week.  When you rejected our form of Christianity we blamed you.

We griped about the 10 commandments being removed from public arenas and “Merry Christmas” being absent in our local stores, but we did not want anyone to hold us to the 10 commandments, especially the 10th one (go look it up).  We often demanded the Christmas greeting but cursed others if we were not served adequately.  

Our generation told you to worship our way and believe our way but seldom listened to your questions.  In fact, we seldom talked to you about anything.  We tried to buy your allegiance by giving you everything and yet abandoned the one thing you really needed…our time and our love.  

Forgive us.  There was a man named Nehemiah who, when he heard the walls of Jerusalem (the Holy City) were in ruins, sat down, cried, and asked for forgiveness of his sins and his father’s sins.  Forgive us for failing to cry.  Forgive us for not confessing our sins and blaming you for the ills we face.  

After you forgive us, will you find it in your heart to talk with us?  I know we tend to talk to you, but we need help.  We need your help.  The Bible says if a brother asks for bread, don’t give him a stone.  Forgive us for giving you stones that weighed our relationships down.  It says if a brother asked for a coat, give him two.  Forgive us for selling our souls to give you what you wanted instead of what you needed.  We left you naked.  Last of all, it says if your brother asks you to walk a mile with him to walk an extra mile.  We need you to walk with us.  Please forgive us and walk with us once again.  Yes, we need to talk about Jesus.  I would like to know what you think.  I want to talk about the “why” not just the “what.” 

There is a lot more I would like to say, but, instead of a letter, let’s walk.  Let’s talk. The relationships are broken.  They need to be rebuilt.  I love you.  I miss you.   

From my heart to yours,    John R. Ring

Recently, I have been teaching a class focused on current events and the cultural changes affecting the church.  We like to think that Christianity changes the culture. Actually and Biblically that is not the case.  The biggest problem God’s people have had through the ages is the effect cultural philosophies and ethics impact our faith,

As the children of Israel entered the Promise land Moses warned them about the effects of prosperity.  As Joshua takes over from the patriarch Moses, he foretells their inability to withstand the secular effects.  They didn’t.  We are no different.  

As I have studied and studied hard for this course for the first time in my ministerial life I feel inadequate.  Woefully inadequate is a better description.  I am convinced that the issue we face today is the same issue the children of Israel faced.  We give token attention to God and have succumbed to the influences of living in one of the most prosperous times in American history.  It was not that long ago that an average family did not have “spendable income.”  Now we are defined by the “spendable income” we acquire.  

As we fight the ethical dilemmas prosperity and comfort create, technology has sped up the pace of life so fast we only can be concerned about the moment and those people directly in front of us.  Gone are the days when we knew our neighbors, and, yes, I wrote neighbor with an “s.”  Technology allows us to exist in our castles, picking and choosing for whom we will lower the gate, allowing them into our personal kingdom.  

Too many families don’t even know each other.  Each person can establish his or her own kingdom in the comfort of their own room, touching each others lives through the various social medias.  There is great value in social media,; however it has the ability to isolate us more than integrate us.  Do you know who is on each family’s social media outlets?  And we used to worry about who their friends were down the street.  

This world can be confusing and full of fear.  Many from the older generations have gone silent, only speaking to their children and grandchildren with judgement and ridicule simply because their world is not our world.  We label those outside of our world.  I recently read an article that says the Millennials are saving more money for retirement than the Baby Boomers. We thought they were lazy.  They aren’t lazy.  They function differently than we did.  We kept talking at them like they were still 10 years old instead of talking with them.  That’s what an isolated people do.  We wonder why they are critical of us.  

As I have studied the six generations and the various cultural ethics and philosophies in our world, I discovered a few things that ring true through all the ages.  The first is that, since the beginning of time and the various changes through the centuries regardless of what we think we are in this together.  Nothing replaces a personal relationship.  Nothing!  Not even the computer, internet, and social media.  What keeps us from personal relationships is our inability to sacrifice our personal kingdoms.  It’s time to lower the gate and leave it down.

Regardless of our generation, we all face failure, illness and death.  Those are the three basic areas demanding personal relationship, which have been around since Adam and Eve did their thing.  The question is will we put in the time necessary to be available and relational when these times come.  Without the personal relationship we are just sounding gongs.

Last but not least there is a characteristic of the younger generations I really like.  They will listen.  They will talk to you.  They will consider the Christian faith.  However, they will only do so if they consider our faith  be authentic.  Next week I will talk about what it takes to have the Christian faith to be authentic.  I do believe Jesus said the same thing many different ways.  Let’s talk in our various studies and groups about authenticity. What a great time to consider Christ not only as a good teacher, a good man or an option but rather as the real deal!